Listed Physical Shares

 

We are emerging as the India's most trusted name in portfolio service provider with the best Assessment for Investment to the Shareholders who find it difficult to organize their Shares which are not traded on any of the stock exchanges. Out of more than 8,000 companies in India that have raised capital and debt from the market, only about 2,000 are traded regularly on the stock exchanges presently. When it comes to small companies the Indian stock markets are not quite liquid. This is where we step in and offer matchless options to shareholders who are stuck with large quantities of shares that they were unable to sell..

 

Delisted Physical Shares

 

Delisting refers to the practice of removing the shares of a Company from Stock Exchange so that the investors can no longer trade shares of the stock in the exchange. This typically occurs when a Company goes out of business, declares bankruptcy, no longer satisfies the listing rules of the Stock Exchange, or has become a private Company after a merger or acquisition or wants to reduce regularly reporting complexities and overhead or if the or if the stock volumes on the exchange from which it wishes to delist are not significant. Delisting does not necessarily mean a change in company's core strategy.

 

Listed Demat shares

Dematerialized Listed Shares (‘Demat’ in short) are listed shares with quoted price that are not on paper and a certificate to that effect does not exist. They exist in the form of entries in the book of depositories. Essentially, unlike the traditional method of possessing a share certificate to the effect of ownership of shares, in the demat system, the shares are held in a dematerialized form. This system works through a bank that is registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to perform the functions of a depository as regulated by SEBI.

 

Delisted Demat shares

 

Dematerialized Listed Shares (‘Demat’ in short) are listed shares with unquoted price that are not on paper and a certificate to that effect does not exist. They exist in the form of entries in the book of depositories. Essentially, unlike the traditional method of possessing a share certificate to the effect of ownership of shares, in the demat system, the shares are held in a dematerialized form. This system works through a bank that is registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to perform the functions of a depository as regulated by SEBI...

 

 

Consultancy

 

Death Case Share

Transmission is the process by which securities of a deceased account holder are transferred to the account of his legal heirs / nominee. Process of transmission in case of dematerialized holdings is more convenient as the transmission formalities for all securities held in a demat account can be completed by submitting necessary documents to the DP. With the help of our team of experts we help you solve the matter in no time.

 

All mutual funds scheme

A mutual fund is an investment vehicle that is made up of funds collected from many investors for the purpose of investing in securities such as stocks, bonds, money market instruments and similar assets. Mutual funds are operated by money managers like us, who invest the fund's capital and attempt to produce capital gains and income for the fund's investors. A mutual fund's portfolio is structured and maintained to match the investment objectives stated in its prospectus. We settle all types of mutual funds by offering spot cash, being our USP.

  • We buy Physical Listed Share
  • We buy Physical Delisted Share
  • We buy Listed Demat Share
  • We buy Delisted Demat Share
  • Consultancy in all death case share
  • Mismatch signature of sellers.
  • Non receipt of share certificates after transfers.
  • Lost/ Transits of share certificates.
  • Duplicate issuance share certificate.
  • Split/ Demerger/ Merger Matters.
  • Death Claims Matters.
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    We Buy Spot Payment

     
     

    INVESTOR EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FUND

     

    Section 205C of the Companies Act, 1956 provided for the establishment a Fund by the Central Government to be called the Investor Education and Protection Fund. The same has been extended in the Companies Act, 2013 (‘Act’ for short) which repealed the Companies Act, 1956

    Section 125 (1) of the Act provides that the Central Government shall establish a Fund to be called the Investor Education and Protection Fund (‘Fund’ for short).

    Source of Fund

  • Grants and Donations
  • Unpaid Dividend Account
  • Transfer From Account Under Section 205A (5) of Companies Act, 1956
  • Amount lying in IEPF under Companies Act, 1956
  • Amount under various provision of the ACT
  • Amount under banking Act
  • Utilisation of fund

  • Transfer of share to the fund
  • Penalty
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